The Soviet Court as a Propaganda Instrument

By Anna Lukina “The Soviet court should, above all, persuade, prove and subordinate the public attention to its moral influence and authority.” Andrei Vyshinskii, “Theory of Evidence in the Soviet Law” (1946) It is well-known that the Soviet court procedure, especially in the 1930s, can be characterized by its lack of due process, judicial independence, … More The Soviet Court as a Propaganda Instrument

I can’t speak French: Linguistic oppression in Revolutionary France and the rise of linguistic nationalism

By James Chetwood Over the next couple of days people all over France will participate in the Fête Nationale. The events of the Revolution it celebrates not only altered the linguistic landscape of France, but it also saw the creation of a language policy which transformed language into a vehicle for nationalism, and means through … More I can’t speak French: Linguistic oppression in Revolutionary France and the rise of linguistic nationalism

Empire and the articulation of fascism: The British Union of Fascists, 1932-1940

By Liam Liburd The legacy of the British Empire left indelible marks on the political, social and economic fabric of Britain. This was as true on the political margins as in the mainstream and was no different for Britain’s most prominent fascist movement, the British Union of Fascists (B.U.F.). The experience of the British Empire, … More Empire and the articulation of fascism: The British Union of Fascists, 1932-1940

Redefining the national community during the Spanish Civil War: Queipo de Llano’s radio propaganda broadcasts

by Joel Baker On 18 July 1936, the army in mainland Spain followed the colonial troops in Morocco and rebelled against the government of the Second Spanish Republic. The coup was only partially successful, and the resulting division of the country marked the start of the Spanish Civil War. The leader of the uprising in … More Redefining the national community during the Spanish Civil War: Queipo de Llano’s radio propaganda broadcasts

The Political Language of Celebration: The Anniversary of the October Revolution, 1918-1932

By Jon Rowson ‘It is impossible to build socialism in white gloves’ – Mikhail Kalinin, 7 November 1930[1] The Anniversary of the October Revolution was the apogee of public politics in the young Soviet state. The celebrations, lasting 2-3 days in all areas of the USSR, were a means of honouring the previous year’s achievements, … More The Political Language of Celebration: The Anniversary of the October Revolution, 1918-1932

A Bulwark Made of Words: the Francoist Press during the Second World War

By Miguel Rivas Venegas In the opinion of Sir Samuel Hoare, British Ambassador in Spain, the Spanish press from the 1940s was a toy in the hands of the Third Reich’s Propaganda Minister, Joseph Goebbels. Newspapers were full of terminology described by the researcher Luis Veres as the ‘lexical arsenals’ of authoritarian regimes, and were … More A Bulwark Made of Words: the Francoist Press during the Second World War

Explaining away poverty: Soviet residential childcare and social problems after 1953

By Mirjam Galley Until Stalin’s death, Soviet children’s homes had been orphanages, housing children who had lost their parents to war, disease, or Stalin’s own terror campaigns. His successor Nikita Khrushchev set out to change that system of institutions for good. Khrushchev renounced his predecessor’s rule of terror in his so-called Secret Speech (1956) and, … More Explaining away poverty: Soviet residential childcare and social problems after 1953

The Costs of Omission in Soviet Central Asia

by Alun Thomas The first complete census of the population of the Soviet Union was produced in 1926. Soviet authorities had conducted major censuses before, in 1920 and 1923, but the former was highly geographically limited and the latter was restricted to urban spaces.[i] Nor had been made a meaningful study of Soviet Central Asia, … More The Costs of Omission in Soviet Central Asia

‘It is not the Maghreb that Islamised itself… It is Islam that maghrebised itself’

By Imen Neffati Located on the Western tip of the Arab world, Tunisia shares with Algeria and Morocco certain historical and cultural characteristics. They are all Arab Islamic societies of Berber ancestry. They all experienced a period of French colonization before becoming independent nation-states in the mid 1950s to the early 1960s. And, crucially, nowhere … More ‘It is not the Maghreb that Islamised itself… It is Islam that maghrebised itself’