Doctor Zhivago as a Response to the Weaponization of Soviet Literature and Mass Culture

By Lonny Harrison Almost from the moment they seized control in November 1917, the Bolsheviks nationalized the publishing industry and tightly controlled the press. Soviet authorities were never ashamed of their monopoly on media and culture, viewing them as weapons of class struggle. After all, media had been used by the bourgeoisie for their own … More Doctor Zhivago as a Response to the Weaponization of Soviet Literature and Mass Culture

The Soviet Court as a Propaganda Instrument

By Anna Lukina “The Soviet court should, above all, persuade, prove and subordinate the public attention to its moral influence and authority.” Andrei Vyshinskii, “Theory of Evidence in the Soviet Law” (1946) It is well-known that the Soviet court procedure, especially in the 1930s, can be characterized by its lack of due process, judicial independence, … More The Soviet Court as a Propaganda Instrument

I can’t speak French: Linguistic oppression in Revolutionary France and the rise of linguistic nationalism

By James Chetwood Over the next couple of days people all over France will participate in the Fête Nationale. The events of the Revolution it celebrates not only altered the linguistic landscape of France, but it also saw the creation of a language policy which transformed language into a vehicle for nationalism, and means through … More I can’t speak French: Linguistic oppression in Revolutionary France and the rise of linguistic nationalism

Teaching Soviet Children the Language of Science and Technology

By Laura Todd At the beginning of the First Five-Year plan in 1928, the aims of children’s literature neatly intersected with those of the Soviet government’s plans to create a viable and powerful state, built on the promotion of knowledge, science, and technology. Soviet children, as the generation who would oversee and complete the transition … More Teaching Soviet Children the Language of Science and Technology

Empire and the articulation of fascism: The British Union of Fascists, 1932-1940

By Liam Liburd The legacy of the British Empire left indelible marks on the political, social and economic fabric of Britain. This was as true on the political margins as in the mainstream and was no different for Britain’s most prominent fascist movement, the British Union of Fascists (B.U.F.). The experience of the British Empire, … More Empire and the articulation of fascism: The British Union of Fascists, 1932-1940

Refugees, Exiles and Émigrés: Russia Abroad and the Semantics of Displacement

By Eilish Hart Following the 1917 Revolution over a million Russians fled to Europe to escape the turmoil of the ensuing Red Terror and Civil War. Although often referred to as Russian émigrés, these people were actually the first wave of European migrants to be legally classified as refugees. The reason they are now referred … More Refugees, Exiles and Émigrés: Russia Abroad and the Semantics of Displacement

Fulton and Fátima: 1917 in the Mind of Catholic Cold Warriors

by Brooke Sales Lee You might certainly wish for divine intervention, were you a right-wing dictator, circa 1946, who had spent the war making deals with both the Americans and the Germans. For Portugal, that was exactly what the regime got, facilitated by certain eager Americans. In 1954, Bishop Fulton Sheen announced to Americans across … More Fulton and Fátima: 1917 in the Mind of Catholic Cold Warriors

Zealots, bureaucrats or ordinary people? Looking for the Soviet censor.

By Samantha Sherry More often than not, the language of censorship employs tropes of conflict and struggle. One wages a battle with censorship, or struggles against it. Writers are ‘victims’ of an absolute evil. What emerges time and time again is the idea of censorship as an almost abstract force. In my work on the … More Zealots, bureaucrats or ordinary people? Looking for the Soviet censor.