Reformable Victims? The Language of Commercial Sex during the First Decade of Soviet Power

By Siobhán Hearne Prostitution was rife in early twentieth-century Russia. The tsarist authorities installed a system widely known as the ‘supervision of prostitution’ (nadzor za prostitutsiei) in 1843. In order to legally work, prostitutes were required to register with their local police and attend obligatory weekly medical examinations. These women were given a medical ticket … More Reformable Victims? The Language of Commercial Sex during the First Decade of Soviet Power

Language and the Logic of Stalinism in the International Brigades

by Fraser Raeburn There is an old and not necessarily edifying debate that has surrounded the International Brigades almost since their inception. Were the 35,000 men and women who travelled to Spain to defend the Spanish Republic during the bitter civil war of 1936-9 dupes of Stalin? Part of a grand plan to export communism to Western Europe and … More Language and the Logic of Stalinism in the International Brigades

Sensory Disability and the New Soviet Woman

by Hannah Parker Considerable chunks of my PhD so far have been spent trawling the archives for letters written by women in the Soviet Union to newspapers, organs and officials in order to grasp how women reproduced ideological language in their letters, and what this tells me about their understandings of themselves as reconstructed ‘New Soviet … More Sensory Disability and the New Soviet Woman