The Language of ‘Authoritarian’ Regimes

Based in the University of Sheffield’s Department of History, ‘The Language of “Authoritarian” Regimes’ is a collaborative project intended to explore, through a variety of disciplines, the creation, dissemination and reception of discourse in regimes commonly referred to as ‘authoritarian’. We aim to bring together scholars working on the language of ‘authoritarian’ states, and to discuss how as… More The Language of ‘Authoritarian’ Regimes

The Costs of Omission in Soviet Central Asia

By Alun Thomas The first complete census of the population of the Soviet Union was produced in 1926. Soviet authorities had conducted major censuses before, in 1920 and 1923, but the former was highly geographically limited and the latter was restricted to urban spaces.[i] Nor had been made a meaningful study of Soviet Central Asia,… More The Costs of Omission in Soviet Central Asia

‘It is not the Maghreb that Islamised itself… It is Islam that maghrebised itself’

By Imen Neffati Located on the Western tip of the Arab world, Tunisia shares with Algeria and Morocco certain historical and cultural characteristics. They are all Arab Islamic societies of Berber ancestry. They all experienced a period of French colonization before becoming independent nation-states in the mid 1950s to the early 1960s. And, crucially, nowhere… More ‘It is not the Maghreb that Islamised itself… It is Islam that maghrebised itself’

An Emotional Break-Up: Historical Pathos Rhetoric in the Brexit Debate

By Liz Goodwin In an impassioned speech to assembled campaigners in Leeds on the eve of the EU Referendum, Ukip leader Nigel Farage tried to convince his audience to #Vote_Leave. His argument was not new to the campaign as a whole – focused on encouraging ordinary people to make a stand against the lazy European… More An Emotional Break-Up: Historical Pathos Rhetoric in the Brexit Debate

The regulation of identity through names and naming in Twentieth Century Spain

By James Chetwood Un estancia Español I’m going to confess from the get-go that I’m not a historian of Francoist Spain. I’m not even a modernist. And I’m barely even a historian. I’m actually doing a PhD in medieval English naming patterns (yes, that’s a thing you can do). So why am I writing a… More The regulation of identity through names and naming in Twentieth Century Spain

Me avergüenzo de ser británico: Como ciudadano británico y ciudadano de la Unión Europea (aún) me avergüenza escribir esto

Written by Matthew Kerry, this post originally appeared on ctxt.es on June 24, 2016, reproduced with Matt’s permission.   A mis amigos españoles, Como ciudadano británico y ciudadano de la Unión Europea (aún) me avergüenza escribir esto. Me avergüenzo de ser británico. Ante todo, quiero enviar mi solidaridad, dolor y disculpas a todxs lxs trabajadorxs europexs… More Me avergüenzo de ser británico: Como ciudadano británico y ciudadano de la Unión Europea (aún) me avergüenza escribir esto

Monumental time and the Soviet dream: music and (a) post-Utopian temporality

By Claire McGinn The ‘language’ of music is demonstrably unlike the language of literature. Still, music is considered to be as potently (if less specifically) ‘expressive’ a medium as literature. It should, therefore, not be overlooked as a ‘social text’ in its own right;[i] if literary works from the Soviet-controlled Baltic states can be read… More Monumental time and the Soviet dream: music and (a) post-Utopian temporality

The Cultural Revolution: proletarian culture in Sormovo, 1917-1921

By Laura Sumner ‘The Russian worker, except for the very top of the class, usually lacks the most elementary habits and notions of culture’  – Leon Trotsky [1] After the October Revolution the Bolsheviks faced a series of grave political, economic and social challenges. Despite the urgent pressures of economic breakdown and political instability, the… More The Cultural Revolution: proletarian culture in Sormovo, 1917-1921

Reformable Victims? The Language of Commercial Sex during the First Decade of Soviet Power

By Siobhán Hearne Prostitution was rife in early twentieth-century Russia. The tsarist authorities installed a system widely known as the ‘supervision of prostitution’ (nadzor za prostitutsiei) in 1843. In order to legally work, prostitutes were required to register with their local police and attend obligatory weekly medical examinations. These women were given a medical ticket… More Reformable Victims? The Language of Commercial Sex during the First Decade of Soviet Power

Language and the Logic of Stalinism in the International Brigades

by Fraser Raeburn There is an old and not necessarily edifying debate that has surrounded the International Brigades almost since their inception. Were the 35,000 men and women who travelled to Spain to defend the Spanish Republic during the bitter civil war of 1936-9 dupes of Stalin? Part of a grand plan to export communism to Western Europe and… More Language and the Logic of Stalinism in the International Brigades

Sensory Disability and the New Soviet Woman

by Hannah Parker Considerable chunks of my PhD so far have been spent trawling the archives for letters written by women in the Soviet Union to newspapers, organs and officials in order to grasp how women reproduced ideological language in their letters, and what this tells me about their understandings of themselves as reconstructed ‘New Soviet… More Sensory Disability and the New Soviet Woman